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Laminated vs. Coated PVC


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#1 Guest_Uptown Events_*

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 05:55 AM

This was a tent article but I felt as if it had alot of good information regarding vinyal in general.

When you polled most professionals in the tent rental industry, the majority answer would be cost. As it turns out, cost is only a result of the overall equation that is too often the ending point for many conversations on the subject. The primary difference in these fabrics rests in the method of the application of the vinyl to the base fabric. The results of these two construction methods each have their own benefits and drawbacks.

By no way do we believe that either fabric is the “Best” solution for everyone or every application, we’ll let you decide which would be the best for your company. We hope the analysis and information presented below will help you choose the right fabric for your needs.

Generic Definition: Most all (95%) of all fabric used in the tent rental industry are constructed of a polyester base fabric with a Poly Vinyl Carbonate (PVC) coating or lamination. The method of application of the PVC creates the difference between coated vinyl and laminated vinyl. Tent Vinyl is typically measured and evaluated by weight per square yard, however other factors to consider when choosing and specifying a vinyl include, adhesion, tensile strength, tear strength, smoothness of fabric, abrasion resistance, UV Resistance, cost, hand (or the softness of the fabric), roll width, and roll length.

In basic terms, the strength of the fabric is created by the base polyester fabric. The more yarns per square inch, the size of those yarns and the method of the construction of the scrim dictate the tensile and tear strength of the fabric. The PVC simply allows for a flexible membrane that can keep moisture out and allows for an easily cleanable fabric.


Laminated PVC is composed of a base polyester scrim that is placed between two or more layers of PVC film. These multiple layers of material in huge roll form are fused together in a PVC Laminating machine using extreme pressure and heat to create one solid piece of fabric. Often opaque layers and adhesives are additionally used to attain desired specifications. The formed material is passed over rollers to create the desired finished appearance (i.e. glossy, matte, etc.). The thickness of the raw PVC film on each side of the scrim added to the base fabric (scrim) result in a desired finished weight can add to its performance under Ultraviolet (UV) conditions (on the top side of the laminate) and abrasion resistance (on the bottom side of the laminate).

As a result of the application of a consistent layer/thickness of film on each side of the fabric, the film will fill into the hills and valleys of the base fabric creating a rougher texture (usually on the back side of the fabric). The narrower the openings of the mesh (base fabric) causes a reduction in the depth of the hills and valleys to fill and result a smoother the final appearance of the finished product. Unfortunately, the narrower the openings in the base fabric will in turn decrease the adhesion of the film to itself resulting in “delamination” or poor welding performance. Increasing the thickness of the PVC film will also result in a smoother product but will also add more weight to the finished fabric

Most all vinyl used in the construction of tents is inherently flame retardant, meaning that no additional flame retardant treatment is ever necessary during the lifetime of the fabric. Laminated fabrics are commonly used in the following weights: 12oz/sqyd, 16oz/sqyd, 18oz/sqyd and can be fabricated in any range from 10oz to 28oz.

Coated PVC is composed of a similar base polyester fabric that is passed through molten liquid vinyl and then extruded (or shaved) down to the desired thickness. As with laminated fabrics the coated formed material is passed over rollers to create the desired finished appearance. The resulting fabric is generally smoother on both sides when compared to laminate PVC. The thickness of the raw PVC film on each side of the scrim added to the base fabric (scrim) result in a desired finished weight can add to its performance under Ultraviolet (UW) conditions (on the top side of the laminate) and abrasion resistance (on the bottom side of the fabric).

The result of the extrusion or shaving of the PVC to the base fabric creates a PVC layer that is contoured to the base fabric, filling the valleys with PVC while the exposed surface remains very smooth.

Most all vinyl used in the construction of tents is inherently flame retardant meaning that no additional treatment is ever necessary during the lifetime of the fabric. Coated fabrics are commonly used in the following weights: 18oz/sqyd, 20oz/sqyd, 24oz/sqyd and can be fabricated in any range from 16oz/sqyd to 32oz/sqyd.


Benefits & Draw Backs:

Laminated Fabrics:
Benefits
• Lower cost
• Greater availability (Domestic Production)
• Greater color selection
• Less stringent parameters for special order runs (often around 500yd minimums)
• Higher strength to weight ratio-Both tensile and tear strengths
• Most domestic patterning is based on 61” width goods (all manufacturers)

Drawbacks
• Rougher under side of fabric, less easy to clean
• Less resistance to pin holes (as a result of less PVC in the fabric)
• Less pliable with age (as a result of less PVC in the fabric)

Coated Fabrics:
Benefits
• Smoother finish (easier to clean)
• High tensile strength
• Greater durability
• Greater resistance to pinholes
• More pliable in cold weather conditions

Drawbacks:
• Higher cost – (weak Dollar, transportation, lead time, etc.)
• No domestic production
• Stringent parameters for special order runs (often around 5500yd minimums)
• Very few color options
• Fewer weights to choose from
• Weaker tear strength


#2 nena

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 10:07 AM

This was a tent article but I felt as if it had alot of good information regarding vinyal in general.

When you polled most professionals in the tent rental industry, the majority answer would be cost. As it turns out, cost is only a result of the overall equation that is too often the ending point for many conversations on the subject. The primary difference in these fabrics rests in the method of the application of the vinyl to the base fabric. The results of these two construction methods each have their own benefits and drawbacks.

By no way do we believe that either fabric is the “Best” solution for everyone or every application, we’ll let you decide which would be the best for your company. We hope the analysis and information presented below will help you choose the right fabric for your needs.

Generic Definition: Most all (95%) of all fabric used in the tent rental industry are constructed of a polyester base fabric with a Poly Vinyl Carbonate (PVC) coating or lamination. The method of application of the PVC creates the difference between coated vinyl and laminated vinyl. Tent Vinyl is typically measured and evaluated by weight per square yard, however other factors to consider when choosing and specifying a vinyl include, adhesion, tensile strength, tear strength, smoothness of fabric, abrasion resistance, UV Resistance, cost, hand (or the softness of the fabric), roll width, and roll length.

In basic terms, the strength of the fabric is created by the base polyester fabric. The more yarns per square inch, the size of those yarns and the method of the construction of the scrim dictate the tensile and tear strength of the fabric. The PVC simply allows for a flexible membrane that can keep moisture out and allows for an easily cleanable fabric.


Laminated PVC is composed of a base polyester scrim that is placed between two or more layers of PVC film. These multiple layers of material in huge roll form are fused together in a PVC Laminating machine using extreme pressure and heat to create one solid piece of fabric. Often opaque layers and adhesives are additionally used to attain desired specifications. The formed material is passed over rollers to create the desired finished appearance (i.e. glossy, matte, etc.). The thickness of the raw PVC film on each side of the scrim added to the base fabric (scrim) result in a desired finished weight can add to its performance under Ultraviolet (UV) conditions (on the top side of the laminate) and abrasion resistance (on the bottom side of the laminate).

As a result of the application of a consistent layer/thickness of film on each side of the fabric, the film will fill into the hills and valleys of the base fabric creating a rougher texture (usually on the back side of the fabric). The narrower the openings of the mesh (base fabric) causes a reduction in the depth of the hills and valleys to fill and result a smoother the final appearance of the finished product. Unfortunately, the narrower the openings in the base fabric will in turn decrease the adhesion of the film to itself resulting in “delamination” or poor welding performance. Increasing the thickness of the PVC film will also result in a smoother product but will also add more weight to the finished fabric

Most all vinyl used in the construction of tents is inherently flame retardant, meaning that no additional flame retardant treatment is ever necessary during the lifetime of the fabric. Laminated fabrics are commonly used in the following weights: 12oz/sqyd, 16oz/sqyd, 18oz/sqyd and can be fabricated in any range from 10oz to 28oz.

Coated PVC is composed of a similar base polyester fabric that is passed through molten liquid vinyl and then extruded (or shaved) down to the desired thickness. As with laminated fabrics the coated formed material is passed over rollers to create the desired finished appearance. The resulting fabric is generally smoother on both sides when compared to laminate PVC. The thickness of the raw PVC film on each side of the scrim added to the base fabric (scrim) result in a desired finished weight can add to its performance under Ultraviolet (UW) conditions (on the top side of the laminate) and abrasion resistance (on the bottom side of the fabric).

The result of the extrusion or shaving of the PVC to the base fabric creates a PVC layer that is contoured to the base fabric, filling the valleys with PVC while the exposed surface remains very smooth.

Most all vinyl used in the construction of tents is inherently flame retardant meaning that no additional treatment is ever necessary during the lifetime of the fabric. Coated fabrics are commonly used in the following weights: 18oz/sqyd, 20oz/sqyd, 24oz/sqyd and can be fabricated in any range from 16oz/sqyd to 32oz/sqyd.


Benefits & Draw Backs:

Laminated Fabrics:
Benefits
• Lower cost
• Greater availability (Domestic Production)
• Greater color selection
• Less stringent parameters for special order runs (often around 500yd minimums)
• Higher strength to weight ratio-Both tensile and tear strengths
• Most domestic patterning is based on 61” width goods (all manufacturers)

Drawbacks
• Rougher under side of fabric, less easy to clean
• Less resistance to pin holes (as a result of less PVC in the fabric)
• Less pliable with age (as a result of less PVC in the fabric)

Coated Fabrics:
Benefits
• Smoother finish (easier to clean)
• High tensile strength
• Greater durability
• Greater resistance to pinholes
• More pliable in cold weather conditions

Drawbacks:
• Higher cost – (weak Dollar, transportation, lead time, etc.)
• No domestic production
• Stringent parameters for special order runs (often around 5500yd minimums)
• Very few color options
• Fewer weights to choose from
• Weaker tear strength




Do you know of a whole sale for vinyl 18oz?
I am in California.

#3 BounceAboutPartyRentals

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 10:15 AM

Wow Upt, this has to be THE longest post I have EVER seen. Even EventMaster couldn't top this one..lol

#4 Guest_Uptown Events_*

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 11:19 AM

Nothing better then the old "Ctrl+C" (left mouse click) "Ctrl+V" and a HUGE post is born. I hope people do read this too.


Whole sale you say? How much? What widths?




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